On July 20, 2018, the Alabama Communication Association and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) will be hosting a
Southern Colloquium on Rhetoric
with distinguished scholar Dr. J. Michael Hogan as the speaker.

Dr. J. Michael Hogan is the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric at The Pennsylvania State University, and is currently a visiting professor and chair of Communication Studies at Davidson College.
Dr. Hogan is the founding director of the Center for Democratic Deliberation at Penn State, as well as the founding co‚Äźeditor of the Penn State Press book series, Rhetoric and Democratic Deliberation. He is the author, coauthor, or editor of eight books and more than 60 articles, book chapters, and reviews and has won a number of scholarly awards, including the National Communication Association's Distinguished Scholar Award.

Southern Colloquium on Rhetoric
University of Alabama in Huntsville
“Rhetorical Studies and the Gun Debate”
Friday, July 20, 2018

Facilitator: J. Michael Hogan, Edwin Erle Sparks Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric, Penn State University, and Visiting Professor, Davidson College

Schedule

Shelby Center for Science and Technology
Room 301
301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899
Telephone 256-824-6645

1:00 p.m. Gathering and hospitality

1:30 p.m.
Session 1: The NRA and America’s Gun Culture

Primary Texts:

Charlton Heston,
Charlton Heston, “Winning the Cultural War,” Harvard Law School Forum, February 16, 1999, http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/charltonhestonculturalwar.htm.

Wayne LaPierre, “National Rifle Association Press Conference . . . Following the Newtown, Connecticut Shootings,” December 21, 2012,
American Rhetoric,
http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/waynelapierrenraschoolshieldpresser.htm.

Secondary Texts:

Laura J. Collins, “The Second Amendment as Demanding Subject: Figuring the Marginalized Subject in Demands for an Unbridled Second Amendment,”
Rhetoric and Public Affairs 17 (2014): 737-756.
Brett Lunceford, “Armed Victims: The Ego Function of Second Amendment Rhetoric,” Rhetoric and Public Affairs, 18 (2015): 333-345.
J. Michael Hogan and Craig Rood, “Rhetorical Studies and the Gun Debate: A Public Policy Perspective,” Rhetoric & Public Affairs 18, no. 2 (2015): 364.
3:00 p.m. Break, hospitality
3:30 p.m.
Session 2: Rhetorical Responses to Gun Violence
Primary Texts:
Barack Obama, “Remarks by the President at a Memorial Service for the Victims of the Shooting in Tucson, Arizona (12 January 2011),” Voices of Democracy 13 (2018), http://voicesofdemocracy.umd.edu/barack-obama-memorial-service-tucson-arizona-speech-text/.
Barack Obama, “Interfaith Prayer Vigil Address at Newtown High School,” December 16, 2012,
American Rhetoric, https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/barackobama/barackobamanewtownvigilspeech.htm.
Barack Obama, “Address Detailing Steps to Reduce Gun Violence,” January 5, 2016,
American Rhetoric, https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/barackobama/barackobamagunviolencereduction.htm.
Secondary Texts:

Bess Meyer, “Barack Obama: ‘Remarks by the President at a Memorial Service for the Vicitms of the Shooting in Tucson, Arizona (12 January 2011),
Voices of Democracy 13 (2018): 24-36, http://voicesofdemocracy.umd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Myers-Interpretive-Essay-PDF.pdf.

Craig Rood, “’Our Tears are Not Enough’: The Warrant of the Dead in the Rhetoric of Gun Control,”
Quarterly Journal of Speech (2017), 1-24.